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2023 to 2027 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

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Executive Summary

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is pleased to present our 2023 to 2027 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS). The strategy describes what we will do to advance the commitments made in the 2022 to 2026 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). We present the programs, policies, and scientific research that illustrate our department’s is committment to the inclusive and sustainable development of Canada’s natural resources.

As outlined in the Introduction, this DSDS is the first to be framed around the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations 2030 Agenda, providing the department with an opportunity to highlight the range of our sustainable development activities over the next four years, how we intend to measure our progress in achieving these goals, and how our efforts impact Canadians. Our Strategy is detailed in four sections:

  • NRCan’s Vision for Sustainable Development outlines our commitment to the sustainable development of Canada’s natural resources, our work to address the impacts of climate change on Canada and Canadians, and how we will achieve these objectives through our policies and programs. 
  • In Listening to Canadians, we share the results of a 120-day public consultation period on the FSDS that helped us shape our DSDS to directly address the issues that matter most to Canadians. These include strengthening support for nuclear energy in Canada’s transition towards a clean energy future; advancing Indigenous rights, ownership, and leadership in the natural resources sector; and integrating social, economic, and environmental sustainable development considerations in the work that we do.
  • NRCan’s Commitments presents the 47 targeted and measurable actions that our department is taking to advance 11 of the 17 FSDS Goals, including through collaborations with international partners, provinces and territories, Indigenous partners, and industry stakeholders.
  • Finally, Integrating Sustainable Development describes our Strategic Environmental Assessment practices and how we plan to integrate sustainable development internally through efforts such as the Greening Government Strategy.

Our 2023-27 DSDS provides us with the opportunity to illustrate how NRCan contributes to key sustainable development initiatives and commitments for Canada. In the coming years, our policies and programs will continue to improve both how we support Canada’s natural resources sector and Canadians’ overall quality of life. Our DSDS will also continue to evolve to reflect the changing priorities of the Department and of the Government of Canada.  

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Section 1: Introduction to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2022 to 2026 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. This is the first FSDS to be framed using the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations 2030 Agenda and provides a balanced view of the environmental, social and economic dimensions of sustainable development.

In keeping with the purpose of the Act, to make decision-making related to sustainable development more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Natural Resources Canada supports the goals laid out in the FSDS through the activities described in this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS).

The Federal Sustainable Development Act also sets out 7 principles that must be considered in the development of the FSDS as well as DSDSs. These basic principles have been considered and incorporated in Natural Resources Canada’s DSDS.

In order to promote coordinated action on sustainable development across the Government of Canada, this departmental strategy integrates efforts to advance Canada’s implementation of the 2030 Agenda National Strategy, supported by the Global Indicator Framework (GIF) and Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) targets and indicators. To inform the development of the Canada’s Annual Report on the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, this departmental strategy also presents a number of planned initiatives that are not directly linked to the FSDS.

Sustainable Development at Natural Resources Canada

NRCan is the department responsible for creating a sustainable natural resource advantage for Canadians. Our policies and programs promote the responsible management of Canada’s natural resource sectors for ongoing environmental sustainability, economic prosperity and continued respect for our communities and Indigenous peoples. As a science-based department, we support research, development and demonstration for innovative technologies and nature-based solutions that enhance sustainability and help to address the devastating impacts of climate change, such as the increasing frequency and intensity of wildfires in Canada. We also invest in Canadian natural resource industries to foster a skilled, diverse, and knowledge-based workforce, and to strengthen Canada’s brand and global leadership in foreign markets. We work with key partners like provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples, communities, academia, and non-governmental organizations to support sustainable development initiatives at all levels of society.

NRCan’s long-term focus on sustainable development includes supporting the Government of Canada’s commitment to pursue net-zero emissions by 2050 and moving our natural resource sectors towards an inclusive green economy. As reflected in the targets and actions in this DSDS, NRCan is well-positioned to meet this challenge through efforts including Canada’s first Critical Minerals Strategy, the Sustainable Jobs Plan, the 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan, and the National Adaptation Strategy.

These efforts, and others, will ensure NRCan is using its world-class scientific research to lead on greenhouse gas emissions reduction and environmental sustainability, while advancing initiatives that offer economic and social benefit through direct investments in industries and communities across the country.

Section 2: Natural Resources Canada’s Sustainable Development Vision

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is committed to the inclusive and sustainable development of Canada’s abundant natural resources to both ensure they are preserved for future generations, and to contribute to federal efforts to address the devastating impacts of climate change, such as wildfires, flooding, earthquakes, and extreme heat, that are being felt by Canadians across the country.

NRCan is taking concrete action to achieve this vision by advancing the transition to net-zero emissions by 2050; investing in scientific innovation and cutting-edge research; supporting the deployment of renewable energy and transmission projects; conserving nature and protecting biodiversity; and advancing the path to reconciliation and shared partnerships with Indigenous Peoples, and an inclusive economy.

With this vision in mind, NRCan is leading on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) Goal 7: Increase Canadians’ Access to Clean Energy, and is contributing to 10 additional FSDS Goals:

Through targeted initiatives and financial investments aligned with the Government of Canada’s ambitions and in support of these FSDS Goals, NRCan is implementing departmental actions that encompass all dimensions of sustainable development—environmental, economic, and social.

Investing in our Vision

NRCan is playing a lead role in implementing the 2030 Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), a roadmap for Canada to reach its emissions reduction target of 40 to 45 percent below 2005 levels by 2030 and net-zero emissions by 2050. The department is leading on 34 measures under the ERP that span infrastructure, the economy, and jobs including:

  • Accelerating the development and adoption of clean technologies. NRCan is leading implementation of Canada’s first ever Critical Minerals Strategy, in collaboration with industry, provincial, territorial, Indigenous, non-governmental, and international partners. Backed by nearly $4 billion in funding, the Strategy aims to increase the supply of responsibly sourced critical minerals and support the development of domestic and global value chains for the green and digital economy. In collaboration with industry stakeholders, provincial and territorial governments, and Indigenous partners, NRCan is implementing the Hydrogen Strategy. Supported in part by the $1.5 billion Clean Fuels Fund, the Strategy will reduce the country’s dependence on fossil fuels while growing economic opportunities at home and abroad. Through a suite of programs, including the Energy Innovation Program, NRCan will continue to fund clean energy research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to advance the commercial viability of technologies that will help Canada meet its climate change targets. NRCan is leading Canada’s Nuclear Energy Leadership Table, as committed to under the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Action Plan to increase deployment of nuclear energy technologies that serve as sources of safe, clean, and affordable energy. With the Clean Growth Hub (co-led with Innovation, Science, and Economic Development), NRCan is helping clean technology innovators and adopters navigate the federal system of funding and services, while advancing coordination on federal clean technology programs.
  • Improving energy efficiency. Through programs including Energy Efficient Buildings RD&D, Deep Retrofit Accelerator Initiative, the Codes Acceleration Fund, and the Canada Greener Homes Initiative, NRCan is improving how our homes and buildings are designed, renovated, and constructed to support decarbonization and develop more climate-resilient infrastructure, while creating jobs in communities. NRCan drives energy efficiency in buildings (residential, commercial, and institutional), industry, and equipment sectors through funding programs, codes, regulations, labelling, and enabling tools, including retrofits.
  • Investing in renewable energy. The Smart Renewables and Electrification Pathways Program was launched in 2021 and will continue to support smart renewable energy and electrical grid modernization projects into the future, including via a recapitalization in Budget 2023. The Program will significantly reduce GHG emissions by encouraging the replacement of fossil-fuel generated electricity with renewables that can provide essential grid services. NRCan’s Emerging Renewable Power Program will continue to support the deployment of emerging renewables not yet established commercially in Canada, including geothermal, tidal, and bi-facial solar, advancing new opportunities to accelerate energy systems transformation.
  • Increasing clean energy access. With a $680 million initiative to fund deployment of electric vehicle chargers and hydrogen refuelling stations across Canada, NRCan is supporting energy-efficient transportation and addressing a key barrier to the adoption of zero-emission vehicles through the Zero Emission Vehicle Infrastructure Program . Canada continues to support the Clean Energy for Rural and Remote Communities Program, with an additional $300 million five-year investment announced in 2022 for renewable energy, capacity building projects, and related energy efficiency measures. This investment includes support for the Indigenous Off-Diesel Initiative, a training and funding program that supports Indigenous-led climate solutions in diesel-reliant remote communities. In addition to funding community-led projects, this investment introduced a single window initiative that aims to streamline access to federal funding for clean energy programs to reduce the administrative complexities, barriers and fatigue experienced by communities. The initiative, which was gifted the name Wah-ila-toos following a sacred naming ceremony held by grandmothers and elders, is a collaboration between multiple federal departments and supported by an Indigenous Advisory Council.
  • Implementing nature-based solutions. The 2 Billion Trees Commitment, provides funding to provinces and territories, Indigenous governments and organizations, and non-profit organizations, to plant two billion incremental trees by 2031. Planting these trees is a significant step forward in Canada’s approach to tackle both climate change and biodiversity loss. These trees will capture and store carbon, improve air and water quality, cool our urban centres, and create and support thousands of green jobs.
  • Ensuring workers are at the forefront of sustainable development. Announced in 2023, the Sustainable Jobs Plan lays the groundwork for a federal governance, engagement, and accountability framework to advance economic prosperity and ensure workers benefit from the opportunities presented by a low-carbon economy. As part of 10 key action items under the Plan, the Canadian Sustainable Jobs Act was introduced in June 2023 to establish a Sustainable Jobs Partnership Council that will provide independent advice on sustainable jobs measures; to create a Secretariat to lead the Government’s sustainable jobs approach; and to release a Sustainable Jobs Action Plan every five years beginning in 2025.

Beyond the ERP, NRCan will continue to:

  • Leverage our world-class scientific innovation to protect Canadians from the impacts of natural and human-induced hazards, and support Canadian companies whose products and services contribute to concrete solutions to these problems.
  • Advance climate change adaptation and resilience by building skills, providing guidance, enabling emergency-preparedness tools, and sharing foundational science and expertise in support of the National Adaptation Strategy. This approach establishes both short- and long-term goals to build resilience to current and emerging climate risks (e.g., wildfires, floods, and extreme heat), among others.
  • Conserve biodiversity and support recovery of species at risk to achieve our goal of protecting 30% of our land and inland waters by 2030.
  • Work with Indigenous Peoples to advance reconciliation and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act to make meaningful change in how Indigenous Peoples, communities, and businesses participate in natural resources development.
  • Build a more equitable, diverse, and inclusive low-carbon future by advocating for equality in the clean energy workforce, and by working with partners to create more opportunities for under-represented people including women, LGBTQ2S Canadians, Black and racialized Canadians, and persons with disabilities.
  • Develop the NRCan Greening Strategy to integrate greening efforts across NRCan operations and services in support of Canada's commitment to sustainable and climate resilient operations.

These collective efforts will ensure a sustainably developed natural resource sector is inclusive and competitive for all Canadians, from coast to coast to coast, for generations to come.

Section 3: Listening to Canadians

As required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act, NRCan reviewed comments received on the draft 2022-2026 FSDS made during the public consultation held from March 11 to July 9, 2022.

During the consultation, more than 700 comments were received from a broad range of stakeholders, including governments, Indigenous organizations, non-governmental organizations, academics, businesses, and individual Canadians in different age groups and of various backgrounds. The draft FSDS was also shared with the appropriate committee of each House of Parliament, the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, and the Sustainable Development Advisory Council for their review and comment.

What We Heard

Across the submissions received, NRCan identified comments that directly relate to our mandate, highlighting opportunities to further strengthen our sustainable development priorities. These comments include:

  • Increasing recognition of and support for the role of nuclear energy in Canada’s clean energy transition;
  • Advancing support for Indigenous rights, ownership, and leadership in renewable energy, conservation, and natural resources development projects; and
  • Improving integration of the social and economic dimensions of sustainable development to ensure our departmental actions move beyond an environmental focus.

What We Did

Comments from the public consultation on the draft FSDS were used to inform our sustainable development strategy at both the federal and departmental levels. As outlined below, NRCan considered these comments to ensure the voices of Canadians are reflected in our contributions to both the final published FSDS and to this DSDS, through the specific and targeted actions detailed in Section 4.

Specifically:

To increase recognition of and support for the role of nuclear energy in Canada’s clean energy transition:

  • In the FSDS, nuclear energy, and small modular reactors (SMRs) in particular, are now part of NRCan’s “all-options” approach to achieve the Government of Canada’s ambitious commitments to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.  
  • As detailed in this DSDS, NRCan launched the Enabling Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) Program in February 2023. Building on the 2020 SMR Action Plan for the development, demonstration, and deployment of SMRs, the Enabling Small Modular Reactors Program will support the frameworks necessary for SMRs to displace fossil fuels and contribute to climate change mitigation, while enhancing gender-equality, diversity, and inclusion in the nuclear sector. The Program will provide $29.6 million in funding over four years to for-profit and non-profit groups, governments, academia, and Indigenous organizations for research and development (R&D) projects focused on addressing SMR-generated waste, and development of supply chains for SMR manufacturing and fuel supply. As SMR utilization expands, nuclear energy will become a key player in achieving net-zero emissions and will become increasingly recognized and accepted by Canadians as a non-emitting source of energy.

To advance support for Indigenous rights, ownership, and leadership in renewable energy, conservation, and natural resource development projects:

  • As reflected in the FSDS, NRCan will contribute to development and publication of annual progress reports on implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Actbetween 2023 and 2026, and every year on an ongoing basis, to ensure measures outlined in the UN Declaration Action Plan and federal laws are consistent with the Declaration.
  • As detailed in this DSDS, NRCan is leading several initiatives guided by the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act that will ensure Indigenous communities benefit from natural resource projects now and in the future. For example:
    • In partnership with Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada and the Department of Finance, NRCan is engaging with Indigenous partners to develop the National Benefits-Sharing Framework (NBSF). The NBSF will improve the quality and consistency of benefits that Indigenous communities derive from major natural resource projects in their territories, fostering the removal of barriers to participation of Indigenous Peoples in the Canadian economy.
    • Under Wah-ila-toos (formerly known as the Clean Energy in Indigenous Rural and Remote Communities Hub), NRCan will increase the number of funded projects that help reduce reliance on diesel fuel for heat and power through community-driven clean energy solutions, while simultaneously creating new green jobs and local economic opportunities as part of the clean energy transition.
    • Through the Regional Energy and Resource Tables, NRCan is establishing joint partnerships with provinces and territories, and formal collaboration with Indigenous partners. The Tables will align regional priorities, funding and financing opportunities, and policy and regulatory approaches to accelerate economic activity and create comparative advantage in the low-carbon future across the country. Using a tailored approach to engagement with Indigenous partners, NRCan will ensure that Indigenous priorities and perspectives on regional opportunities are reflected, encouraging inclusive and sustainable economic growth for all Canadians.

To improve integration of the social and economic dimensions of sustainable development to ensure our departmental actions move beyond an environmental focus:

  • As reflected in the FSDS, NRCan introduced the Canadian Sustainable Jobs Act (Bill C-50) in June 2023 to establish a federal governance, engagement, and accountability framework to advance economic prosperity and ensure workers benefit from the opportunities presented by a low-carbon economy. By advancing funding for skills development toward sustainable jobs, Canada will ensure equitable, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth across the country.
  • As detailed in this DSDS, NRCan is leading on initiatives that advance sustainable development in all its dimensions—environmental, social, and economic. For example:
    • NRCan is leading the Critical Minerals Strategy to advance a clean economy while creating jobs for Canadians. The Strategy will help make Canada a global supplier of choice for the critical minerals that are the foundation of clean and digital technologies—used to manufacture products ranging from electric vehicle batteries, to solar panels, to wind turbines. By leveraging Canada’s natural abundance of critical minerals and our competitive advantage, the Critical Minerals Strategy will set the stage for economic growth and job creation, with investments in workers, businesses, and communities along the critical minerals value chain across the country.
    • Witha recapitalization of the Smart Renewables and Electrification Pathways Program in Budget 2023, NRCan will continue to support smart renewable energy and electrical grid modernization projects that use market-ready technologies to generate environmental, social, and economic benefits. Program outcomes include decreased greenhouse gas emissions from Canada’s electricity system; increased renewable energy generation capacity; job creation; increased equity, diversity, and inclusion in the energy sector; and increased meaningful Indigenous ownership of smart renewable energy projects.

Please find more information on the FSDS public consultation and its results in the FSDS Consultation Report.

Section 4: Natural Resources Canada’s Commitments


Goal 4 Icon

GOAL 4: PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

FSDS Context:

Knowledge and education are critical to increasing climate literacy and supporting climate action. Canadians’ knowledge and awareness of climate change, environmental and nature conservation topics is increasing; as is the perception that individual actions have a positive impact on environmental change; and actions to help fight climate change, conserve nature and achieve a cleaner and safer environment are possible. Continuing to promote knowledge and skills for sustainable development is critical to mitigating climate change and its impacts, and NRCan is working as part of a multi-departmental effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote climate adaptation through innovative research using behavioural science insights. Additionally, NRCan is working in collaboration with Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), the Impact Assessment Agency of Canada (IAAC), and several other departments and agencies, all key contributors to the Open Science and Data Platform. The Platform supports cumulative effects assessments for federal regulatory processes by providing access to authoritative data and information on topics related to development activities, the environment, and communities.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal Promote knowledge and skills for sustainable development” but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs
Conduct research supporting climate change mitigation and adaptation

Apply behavioural science insights and methods with robust policy analysis to promote climate action

Program:
Internal Services

Performance indicator:
Number of teams at NRCan using behavioural science tools to design research projects to better understand Canadians’ interest in sustainability-related topics (e.g., heat pump adoption, electric vehicle adoption, etc.)

Starting point:
0 in 2021

Target:
4 by March 31, 2024

NRCan, in collaboration with PCO and ECCC, is working on the Program of Applied Research and Climate Action (PARCA) aimed at using behavioural science insights to understand Canadians’ perspectives on climate change, in order to develop behaviourally-informed solutions with the potential to reduce GHG emissions and promote climate adaptation at the individual and community level. This work, conducted by behavioural scientists embedded in teams, will generate new insights to inform policy development, program design, and public communications promoting sustainable development.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to inclusive and quality education throughout their lives

GIF Target: 4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship, and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.

Other

Provide, through the Open Science and Data Platform (OSDP), access to science and data related to cumulative effects, including climate change and adaptation

Program:
Geoscience for Sustainable Development of Natural Resources

Performance indicator:
Percentage of Open Science and Data Platform (OSDP) users who indicate they accessed the OSDP to acquire research and knowledge in support of sustainable development

Starting point:
New program (0% in April 2023)

Target:
70% annually

NRCan is working in collaboration with ECCC, IACC, and other departments and agencies to enhance the Open Science and Data Platform. The platform integrates data from NRCan (and from other government departments, provinces, and territories) on forestry, geology, groundwater, and earth observations products such as land cover, and provides Canadians with access to thousands of records of cumulative effects-related data, publications, maps, and information about development activities. Providing access to information relevant to cumulative effects including climate change and development activities enhances Canadians’ trust in our regulatory systems, and climate change and adaptation; as well as supports informed decision-making related to sustainable development.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
GIF Target: 4.7 By 2030, ensure that all learners acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development, including, among others, through education for sustainable development and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence, global citizenship and appreciation of cultural diversity and of culture’s contribution to sustainable development.

Goal 5 Icon

GOAL 5: CHAMPION GENDER EQUALITY

FSDS Context:

While substantial gains have been made over the past several decades, women in Canada and around the world are still significantly underrepresented in decision-making processes, are less likely to be employed or participate in the labour force, and have lower average annual earnings than men. Women are also often underrepresented in clean tech and environmental sectors and occupations. As such, NRCan is committed to increasing representation of Canadian women in leadership roles, and increasing their participation in the clean energy workforce through the Equal by 30 campaign, a public and private sector partnership to address inequalities that remain throughout the energy sector. NRCan also leads the Equality in Energy Transitions Initiative, which seeks to eliminate gender disparities in the energy sector.

Target theme: Take Action on Gender Equality   

Target: By 2026, at least 37% of the environmental and clean technology sector are women (Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Invest in women’s skills, employment, and leadership

Advance the meaningful participation of women and increase inclusion for all underrepresented groups in the clean energy workforce

Program:
Energy and Climate Change Policy

 

Performance indicator:
Number of Canadian signatories to the Equal by 30 Campaign

Starting point:
103 Canadian signatories in April, 2023

Target:
150 Canadian signatories by Dec 31, 2024

The Equal by 30 campaign, led by NRCan, brings together the public and private sector to advance the meaningful participation of women in the energy sector. Signatories to the campaign work to advance gender equality by addressing issues such as equal pay, equal leadership, equal opportunities, inclusive culture, fair management, career development, and workplace safety. Increasing the number of Canadian signatories will create a larger domestic network of governments and organizations working towards a more gender-inclusive and equitable workforce in the energy sector and will showcase Canada’s leadership on this issue.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Gender equality in leadership roles and at all levels of decision-making

CIF Indicator:  5.2.1. Proportion of
leadership roles held by women

GIF Target: 5.5 Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 5 – Gender Equality

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

Canada recognizes that creating a diverse and inclusive workforce, equipped with the knowledge and skills needed for a net zero future-ready sector, means empowering women to ensure they become active participants in the natural resource sectors.

To ensure that the low carbon energy transition is equitable and inclusive, NRCan jointly leads the Equality in Energy Transitions Initiative, a joint effort between the Clean Energy Ministerial and the International Energy Agency, which works to advance gender equality in the energy sector.

NRCan also leads the Awards & Recognition program under the Equality Initiative, which recognizes outstanding individuals and organizations contributing to a clean energy future while advancing the empowerment of women.

These efforts contribute to advancing:

Global Target 5.5 Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life

Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) Target 5.2 Greater representation of women in leadership roles

Goal 7 Icon

GOAL 7: INCREASE CANADIANS’ ACCESS TO CLEAN ENERGY

FSDS Context:

Energy production and use is currently the dominant contributor to climate change, accounting for around 78% of total global greenhouse gas emissions. In Canada, as in the rest of the world, greenhouse gas emissions primarily come from activities such as non-renewable electricity production, oil and gas production, transportation, and heating and cooling of buildings using fossil fuels. Clean and affordable energy is essential to Canada’s and the world’s aspirations to decarbonize, and NRCan is leading the domestic effort. Initiatives in support of this ambition include investing in research, development, demonstration, and deployment of new energy efficient technologies; transitioning remote communities to renewable energy; increasing Canada’s renewable energy generation capacity with funding for electrical grid modernization projects; enhancing energy efficiency regulatory standards; delivering the Clean Fuels Fund to reduce dependence on fossil fuels; and supporting the use of energy efficiency technologies and practices among both homeowners and industries to save costs while advancing Canada’s clean energy ambitions.

Target theme: Renewable and non-emitting sources of electricity

Target: By 2030, 90%, and in the long term 100% of Canada’s electricity is generated from renewable and non-emitting sources (Minister of Natural Resources)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Invest in research, development, and demonstration of clean energy technologies

Support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects in order to address barriers and create innovative solutions related to renewable and non-emitting sources of electricity

Program:
Energy Innovation & Clean Technology

Performance Indicator:
Number of new RD&D projects supportedFootnote 1 related to generation, storage, distribution or management of renewable and non-emitting electricity

Starting Point:
0 as of April 1, 2023

Target: 
22-28 by March 31, 2027

Innovative solutions related to renewable and non-emitting sources of electricity are necessary to develop the technologies and solutions required to achieve Canada’s clean energy ambitions. This departmental action supports the increased participation, collaboration, and investment in RD&D projects related to renewable and non-emitting sources of electricity. Supporting large-scale, complex, cost-intensive, and often high-risk projects is intended to accelerate the development and adoption of technologies in this area. Developing these technologies and solutions will support efforts to improve access to clean energy, and over the longer term reduce GHG emissions.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition/Target: 7.3.1 Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

CIF Indicator: 7.3.1 Proportion of electricity generated from renewable and non-greenhouse gas emitting sources

GIF Target: 7.2 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

Play a leading role to promote clean and renewable energy

Contribute to the core activities of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)

Program:
Electricity Resources

 

Performance Indicator:
Number of IRENA activities to which Canada directly contributes

Starting point:
6 as of May 2023

Target:
12 by March 31, 2027

Canada continues to play a leading role in promoting clean and renewable energy through its active participation in IRENA’s work. This participation includes: shaping organization activities and discussions as a member of the IRENA council; participating in IRENA’s Climate Investment Fund, Coalition for Action, and Global Geothermal Alliance; contributing to IRENA’s Work Program 2020-21 and the Medium-Term Strategy; and active promotion of Canadian initiatives and IRENA-led international events such as the Global Platform for Transitioning Remote Communities to Renewable Energy and Innovation Day in Canada.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

CIF Indicator: 7.3.1 Proportion of electricity generated from renewable and non-greenhouse gas emitting sources

GIF Target: 7.a By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology

Support renewable energy deployment

Fund the construction of new renewable energy generation capacity

Program:
Electricity Resources

 

Performance Indicator:
Megawatts (MW) of new renewable energy generation capacity from projects that received funding from the Smart Renewables and Electrification Pathways Program (SREPs)

Starting point:
33 MW as of April 2023

Target:
2,000 MW by March 31, 2029

SREPs supports renewable energy deployment by directly funding smart renewable energy deployment and electrical grid modernization projects, which increases Canada’s renewable energy generation capacity.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

CIF Indicator: 7.3.1 Proportion of electricity generated from renewable and non-greenhouse gas emitting sources

GIF Target: 7.2 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

Support voluntary action to adopt clean energy technologies

Accommodate more renewable energy on the electricity grid

Program:
Electricity Resources

 

Performance Indicator:
Total public and private investment in projects that receive Smart Renewables and Electrification Pathways Program funding

Starting point:
$655 million in April 2023

Target:
$4 billion by March 31, 2029

Funding provided by the Smart Renewables and Electrification Pathways Program (SREPs) increases voluntary private investment in clean energy by creating a supportive business environment for projects. In addition, all SREPs’ deployment and grid modernization projects must be capable of providing grid services, increasing the amount of total renewable energy projects the grid can accommodate (i.e. not only projects receiving SREPs funds). This directly supports the goal and the 2030 target to have 90% of Canada’s electricity generated from renewable and non-emitting sources.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption

CIF Indicator: 7.2.1 Total energy consumption per capita

GIF Target: 7.1 By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services

Work with partners on clean and renewable energy

Continue to advance the generation of energy from renewable sources in Indigenous, rural, and remote communities

Programs:
Electricity Resources; Energy Innovation & Clean Technology; Forest Sector Competitiveness

Performance Indicator:
Number of renewable energy projects supportedFootnote 2  in rural, remote and Indigenous communities

Starting point:
0 as of April 1, 2017

Target:
150 by March 31, 2024

Through Wah-ila-toos, NRCan funds projects that help reduce reliance on diesel fuel for heat and power through community-driven clean energy solutions. These projects also help create new green jobs and local economic opportunities as part of the clean energy transition. This initiative was first established through Budget 2017’s Green Infrastructure funding as the Clean Energy in Rural and Remote Communities (CERRC). In 2022, NRCan worked with partner departments to develop Wah-ila-toos, a new federal single-window access point for diesel-reliant and Indigenous communities transitioning to clean energy, which is being used to disburse new funding announced in Budget 2021.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

CIF Indicator: 7.3.1 Proportion of electricity generated from renewable and non-greenhouse gas emitting sources

GIF Target: 7.2 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

Target theme: Energy efficiency 

Target: By 2030, 600 petajoulesFootnote 3 of total annual energy savings will be achieved as a result of adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards and practices from a baseline savings of 20.0 petajoules in 2017 to 2018 (Minister of Natural Resources)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Develop and implement energy efficiency codes and regulations

Enhance energy efficiency of products with increasingly stringent standards under the Energy Efficiency Regulations

Program:
Energy Efficiency

 

Performance indicator: Total energy savings (petajoules) from regulating the energy efficiency of products

Starting point:
44.9 petajoules in 2022

Target:
77.4 petajoules in 2030

Regulating energy efficiency standards for products used in our homes, and commercial and industrial sectors helps Canadians benefit from lower energy bills associated with higher energy efficiency products and Canada reach its FSDS target. This departmental action builds on earlier regulatory amendments that increased the energy efficiency standards of products that are expected to be in use by 2030. Previous work between 2016-2022 is expected to achieve annual energy savings of 44.9 petajoules in 2030.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption

CIF Indicator: 7.1.1 Annual energy savings resulting from adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards, and practices.

GIF Target: 7.3 By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

Invest in research, development and demonstration of energy efficiency technologies

Support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects in order to address barriers and create innovative solutions related to the implementation of energy efficient and net-zero energy building technologies

Program:
Energy Innovation & Clean Technology

Performance Indicator:
Number of RD&D projects supportedFootnote 4 related to energy efficient and net-zero energy building technologies

Starting Point:
0 as of April 1, 2017
(20 as of April 1, 2023)

Target:
40-45 by March 31, 2027

Buildings are a key source of greenhouse gas emissions, and investments in RD&D are needed to develop the technologies and solutions required to reduce these emissions, a key element in achieving Canada’s climate goals. Supporting large-scale, complex, cost-intensive, and often high-risk projects is intended to accelerate the development and adoption of energy efficient buildings and building technologies, design, and construction. Developing these technologies and solutions will support efforts to improve energy efficiency in buildings and access to clean energy.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption

CIF Indicator: 7.2.1 Total energy consumption per capita

GIF Target: 7.2 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

Support use of energy efficiency technologies and practices

Improve the energy efficiency of Canadian homes through the Canada Greener Homes Initiative, including the Canada Greener Homes Grant (CGHG) and the Oil to Heat Pump Affordability (OHPA) Program

Program:
Energy Efficiency

Performance Indicator:
Total annual energy savings (petajoules) from the Canada Greener Homes GrantFootnote 5
Starting Point:
New initiative (0 as of December 1, 2020)

Target:
Up to 10.4 petajoules of total annual energy savings by 2027

The Canada Greener Homes Initiative, launched in 2021, helps homeowners save money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by providing grant and loan funding for eligible home retrofits, including energy efficiency retrofits. NRCan’s components include the Canada Greener Homes Grant (CGHG) and the Oil to Heat Pump Affordability (OHPA) Program. CGHG provides grants of up to $5,000 for retrofits and $600 for EnerGuide evaluations. OHPA provides low-to-median income households with up to $10,000 in upfront grants to transition off oil to more efficient heat pumps, without the need for an EnerGuide evaluation. The Initiative reduces energy use and provides energy savings while supporting the goal of increasing access to clean energy.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption

CIF Indicator: 7.1.1 Annual energy savings resulting from adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards and practices

GIF Target: 7.3 By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

Support voluntary action to adopt energy efficiency technologies and practices

Improve the energy performance of industry in Canada by supporting adoption of energy efficiency and energy management solutions through NRCan’s industrial energy efficiency programming

Program:
Energy Efficiency

Performance Indicator:
Total annual energy savings (petajoules) from NRCan’s industrial energy efficiency programming

Starting Point:
4 petajoules in 2017-18

Target:
117 petajoules by 2030

NRCan’s industrial energy efficiency programming helps industrial facilities in Canada to realize energy savings and related cost savings per unit of production, which contributes to competitiveness and sustainability. These savings will support Canada in its efforts to reduce energy consumption and associated GHG emissions.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption

CIF Indicator: 7.1.1 Annual energy savings resulting from adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards, and practices

GIF Target: 7.3 By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

 

Work with domestic and international partners on energy efficiency

Improve the energy efficiency of Canada’s homes and buildings through the Codes Acceleration Fund, which will increase the capacity of jurisdictions, such as provinces and territories, to accelerate the adoption and implementation of the higher tiers of the national model energy codes

Program:
Energy Efficiency

Performance Indicator:
Number of (provincial and territorial) authorities that have jurisdiction and have adopted the higher energy performance tiers of the 2020 model energy codes.

Starting Point:
New initiative (0 in 2022)

Target:
13 provinces and territories adopt minimum Tier 2 of the NECB and NBC 9.36, or equivalents by March 31, 2030

The Codes Acceleration Fund will improve the energy performance of Canada’s homes and buildings over time as they are constructed to higher performance requirements, contributing to Canada’s total energy savings.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption

CIF Indicator: 7.1.1 Annual energy savings resulting from adoption of energy efficiency codes, standards, and practices

GIF Target: 7.3 By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency

Target theme: Clean fuels  

Target: By 2030, increase Canada’s capacity to produce clean fuels by 10% over 2021 levels (Minister of Natural Resources)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Deliver the Clean Fuels Fund

Provide funding to increase Canada’s clean fuels production capacity

Program:
Lower Carbon Transportation

Performance Indicator:
Percentage increase in clean fuels production capacity over 2021 levels

Starting Point:
The baseline of clean fuels production is being developed, and not yet available.

Target:
By December 31,2030, a 10% increase in Canada’s capacity to produce clean fuels over 2021 levels

Increasing Canada’s clean fuels capacity requires investment in the private sector. The Clean Fuels Fund supports businesses that invest in building clean fuel capacity, pushing Canada closer to achieving our goal of increasing Canadians’ access to clean energy, and of ensuring we meet our 2030 target of a 10% increase in clean fuels production capacity over 2021 levels.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:

CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

GIF Target: 7.1 By 2030, ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy services.

Develop and update codes and standards

Support the development and alignment of codes and standards through publications

Program:
Lower Carbon Transportation

Performance Indicator:
Number of publications developed for clean fuels standard development organizations

Starting Point:
New program (0 in 2022)

Target:
At least 250 publications underway by December 31, 2026

Codes and standards are required to make progress in increasing clean fuels capacity. Publications such as standards documents, technical specifications and enabling research, will ensure the safe production, delivery, storage and end-use of these fuels. Clean fuels will play an important role in meeting Canada’s commitment to emissions reduction.   

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

GIF Target: By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable, and modern energy services

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal Increase Canadians’ access to clean energy” but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Invest in research, development, and demonstration of clean fuels

Support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) projects in order to address barriers and create innovative solutions related to clean fuels and industrial fuel switching

Program:
Energy Innovation & Clean Technology

Performance Indicator:
Number of new RD&D projects supportedFootnote 6 related to clean fuels and industrial fuel switching

Starting Point:
0 as of April 1, 2022

Target:
55-65 as of March 31, 2027

Canada’s transportation and industry sectors are currently heavily reliant on fossil fuels. Investments in RD&D are needed to develop the technologies that will enable Canadians to switch to clean energy alternatives (low- and zero-carbon fuels), thereby decarbonizing these sectors and helping Canada achieve its climate goals. This departmental action supports increased participation, collaboration, and investment in clean fuels RD&D projects. Supporting large-scale, complex, cost-intensive, and often high-risk projects is intended to accelerate the development and adoption of clean fuels. Developing these technologies and solutions will support efforts to increase access and adoption of clean fuels, and over the longer term reduce GHG emissions.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition:  Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

CIF Indicator: 7.3.1 Proportion of electricity generated from renewable and non-greenhouse gas emitting sources

GIF Target: 9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

Work with stakeholders to advance the Hydrogen Strategy for Canada

Report and track progress on the Hydrogen Strategy for Canada.

Program:
Lower Carbon Transportation

Performance indicator:
Number of reports tracking and monitoring progress on the Hydrogen Strategy for Canada

Starting point:
New initiative (0 in 2021)

Target: Develop a report every two years beginning in 2023

The Hydrogen Strategy for Canada will help the country on its path to meet climate change goals of net-zero by 2050 by reducing the country’s dependence on fossil fuels. Tracking and monitoring progress on the Hydrogen Strategy will not only allow for understanding and addressing the challenges of growing, distributing, and using this new clean energy source; but it will ensure Canada is on track to meet its ambitions of increasing the availabilityclean fuels.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

GIF Target:  By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

Canada will continue to engage with the global community, including through various international fora (such as the Clean Energy Ministerial and Mission Innovation) to support the development of, access to, investment in, and use of clean energy and enabling technologies. For example, Canada has pledged 8 million dollars in financial support to the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Clean Energy Transitions Programme.

Canada also holds a leadership role in various international fora dedicated to energy efficiency, including as Chair of the IEA Energy Efficiency Working Party, Vice-Chair of the Energy Efficiency Hub, and as member of the Steering Committee of the UN Global Alliance for Buildings and Construction. Canada is also part of Mission Efficiency (formerly the Three Percent Club) with international partners, including 15 other countries, committing to working toward achieving greater annual energy improvements by 2030.

Canada also works with international partners on the development and deployment of small modular reactors (SMR) that have the potential to provide a safe, secure and reliable non-emitting source of baseload energy in Canada (including in remote communities) and globally. To continue strengthening the role of nuclear energy in Canada’s clean energy transition, NRCan launched the Enabling Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) Program in February 2023.

These efforts contribute to advancing:

Global Targets:
7.1 By 2030, ensure universal access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services;

7.3 By 2030, double the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency; and

7.a By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil-fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology

Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) Targets:

7.1.1 By 2030, 600 petajoules of total annual energy savings will be achieved as a result of the adoption of energy efficiency codes, standard sand practices from a baseline savings of 20.0 petajoules in 2017 to 2018

7.3.1 By 2030, 90%, and in the long term 100%, of Canada's electricity is generated from renewable and non-emitting sources
Canadian Ambitions:

7.1 Canadian Ambition: Canadians reduce their energy consumption

7.3 Canadians have access to clean and renewable energy

Goal 8 Icon

GOAL 8: ENCOURAGE INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH IN CANADA

FSDS Context:

Opportunities exist across all sectors for businesses to increase their competitiveness and become more sustainable. To transform the economy, Canada will need to decarbonize and reduce the environmental impacts of existing sectors while growing and supporting clean technology and emerging sector jobs, including by upskilling and reskilling workers, increasing workforce participation, and diversifying local economies. NRCan plays a vital role in encouraging inclusive and sustainable economic growth throughout Canada’s vast natural resources sector. Through the Regional Energy and Resource Tables, NRCan is committed to advancing joint partnerships with provinces and territories, in collaboration with Indigenous partners, to ensure that all Canadians reap the economic benefits of climate action by supporting the creation of jobs, thriving communities, and sustainable economic prosperity from coast to coast to coast. Additionally, through the 2023 Sustainable Jobs Plan and introduction of Bill C-50, the Canadian Sustainable Jobs Act, NRCan is guiding and organizing federal efforts to support workers, businesses, and communities as Canada shifts to a low-carbon economy.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal ‘Encourage inclusive and sustainable economic growth in Canada’ but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Collaborate with provinces and territories through the Regional Energy and Resources Tables 

Establish joint partnerships with provinces and territories– in collaboration with Indigenous partners and with the input of key stakeholders – to identify and accelerate opportunities for transforming Canada’s traditional resource industries and advancing emerging ones for a low carbon future

Program:
Energy and Climate Change Policy

 

Performance indicator:
Number of completed Collaboration Frameworks/roadmaps or other bilateral collaborative plans that include input from Indigenous and other regional partners and for which implementation is underway

Starting point:
New Program (0 as of 2022)

Target:
13 by March 31, 2025

The Regional Energy and Resource Tables (Regional Tables) are a key part of the Government of Canada’s efforts to ensure Canadians reap the economic benefits of climate action. The Tables will align regional priorities, funding and financing opportunities, and policy and regulatory approaches to accelerate economic activity and position every region in Canada to lead in areas where they have, or can create, comparative advantage in the low carbon future. By working collaboratively from coast to coast to coast, this work will encourage inclusive and sustainable economic growth, across all provinces and territories.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians contribute to and benefit from sustainable economic growth

GIF Target: 8.2 Achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labour-intensive sectors.

Implement a mines-to-mobility approach to grow strategic supply chains 

Stimulate domestic and foreign investment into Canada’s industrial and innovation battery ecosystem

Program:
Lower Carbon Transportation

Performance indicator:
Number of anchor investments in Canada’s battery value chain

Starting point:
One as of May 2023

Target:
At least two by March 31, 2025

As the world’s transportation systems decarbonize, advanced batteries for electric vehicles will be in high demand. Canada is well-positioned to provide the world with responsibly produced, low-carbon battery cells, components, minerals and metals. Investment into Canada’s value chain will bring thousands of direct jobs, while also supporting the long-term economic competitiveness of Canada’s automotive and automotive parts sectors.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians contribute to and benefit from sustainable economic growth

CIF Indicator:  8.6.1 Jobs in the clean technology products sector

GIF Target: 8.4 Improve progressively, through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavor to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production, with developed countries taking the lead

Support workers, businesses and communities

Undertake comprehensive action to support the future and livelihood of workers and their communities in the transition to a low-carbon economy via the Canadian Sustainable Jobs Act

Program:
Energy and Climate Change Policy

 

Performance indicator:
Implementation of the Government’s proposed Canadian Sustainable Jobs Act via three elements of legislation: establishing a Partnership Council, a Secretariat, and a Sustainable Jobs Action Plan

Starting point:
New initiative (0 of 3 elements of legislation completed)

Target:
Completion of 3 elements of legislation by March 31, 2026

As detailed in the Sustainable Jobs Plan released in early 2023, the Government introduced sustainable jobs legislation in June 2023 to establish a federal governance, engagement, and accountability framework to advance economic prosperity and ensure workers benefit from the opportunities presented by a low-carbon economy. Once the bill receives royal assent, the Government will be required to establish a Sustainable Jobs Partnership Council to provide independent advice to Government on sustainable jobs measures; create a Secretariat to lead the Government’s sustainable jobs approach; and release a Sustainable Jobs Action Plan every five years beginning in 2025. These mechanisms will guide and organize efforts to support workers and communities as Canada shifts to a low-carbon economy, ensuring equitable, inclusive and sustainable economic growth across the country. Elements of the Bill could change as it is debated in Parliament. 

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians have access to quality jobs

Goal 9 Icon

GOAL 9: FOSTER INNOVATION AND GREEN INFRASTRUCUTRE IN CANADA

FSDS Context:

Canada’s industrial sector is a major driver of economic activity, including income, jobs, and exports. While industry is a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada, many sectors are taking action to green their industries. Green infrastructure plays a key role in conserving natural resources and addressing climate change impacts by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and pollution. Investing in green infrastructure, such as low-carbon transportation, climate-resilient and energy efficient buildings, and clean energy, helps build healthy and resilient communities, protects against a changing climate, promotes environmental sustainability, drives economic growth, and supports a net-zero economy. NRCan is a leader on Canada’s green innovation charge, committed to installing over 80,000 electrical vehicle chargers from coast to coast to coast to provide Canadians with a clean energy and reliable transportation infrastructure; to advancing research, and development and demonstration of clean energy technologies; and to fostering innovation through its open dissemination of core geospatial data, collected through collaborative partnerships with private, public, and Indigenous organizations.

Target theme: Green infrastructure and innovationFootnote 7

Target: By March 31, 2026, 34,500 new electric vehicle chargers and 25 hydrogen refueling stations are completed where Canadians, live, work and play, including in public places, on-street, at multi-unit residential buildings, rural and remote locations and the workplace (Minister of Natural Resources);

Target: By March 31, 2027, contribute to the deployment of 50,000 new zero-emission vehicle chargers and refueling stations (Minister of Natural Resources)Footnote 8

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Invest in the deployment of zero emissions vehicles and refueling infrastructure

Deploy new zero-emission vehicle infrastructureFootnote 9Footnote 10

Program:
Lower Carbon Transportation

Performance indicator:
Number of low-carbon recharging and refueling stations completed

Starting point:
As of March 31, 2023, the program has funded projects that will result in a total of 42, 366 new chargers and 26 new hydrogen stations being built. This includes 4, 108 chargers that are open to the public.

Target:
By March 31, 2027, contribute to the deployment of 84,500 new zero-emission vehicle chargers and 45 hydrogen refuelling stations.

The department is working to support the deployment of new zero emission vehicle infrastructure. Availability of this infrastructure is a key action and that will contribute to the availability and use of electric and hydrogen vehicles by Canadians. This work to deploy zero emission vehicle infrastructure will directly contribute to reaching the target of having 50,000 new electric vehicle chargers and refueling stations, and to the target of having 34,500 new electric vehicle chargers and 45 hydrogen refueling stations completed. This deployment also supports the overall goal of fostering innovation and particularly green infrastructure in Canada.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians have access to modern and sustainable infrastructure

CIF Indicator:  9.6.1 Number of low carbon recharging and refueling stations under development and completed along major highways, and in rural and urban areas across Canada ; and
9.7.1 Number of low carbon recharging and refueling stations under development and completed in public places, on-street, at apartment buildings, retail outlets, and the workplace.

GIF Target:  9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal Foster innovation and green infrastructure in Canada” but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Other

Support research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to address barriers and create innovative solutions related to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS)

Program:
Energy Innovation & Clean Technology

Performance Indicator:
Number of new CCUS-related RD&D projects supportedFootnote 11

Starting Point:
0 as of April 1, 2022

Target:
65-100 by December 31, 2026

CCUS technologies are generally still at an early adoption stage and not yet widely deployed. Investments in CCUS innovation are necessary to deliver on the promise of CCUS to enable large-scale greenhouse gas reductions in Canada and worldwide. This is especially important in sectors such as cement, iron and steel, chemicals and gas-fired power, which will require considerable R&D as well as demonstration at field and pre-commercial scales. This departmental action supports increased participation, collaboration, and investment in CCUS RD&D projects. Supporting large-scale, complex, cost-intensive, and often high-risk projects is intended to accelerate the development and deployment of CCUS. Developing these technologies will support the development and deployment of CCUS, and over the longer term reduce GHG emissions

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canada fosters sustainable research and innovation

CIF Indicator: 9.1.1 Proportion of innovation in environment-related technology

GIF Target: 9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

Other

Continue to implement the Clean Growth Hub’s mandate to help clean technology stakeholders navigate federal programs and initiatives that support innovation.

Program:
Internal Services

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of surveyed Clean Growth Hub clients satisfied with the quality of the Clean Growth Hub’s service

Starting Point:
70% as of March 31, 2022

Target: 70% by March 31, 2026

Together, NRCan and ISED co-lead the Clean Growth Hub to provide a single point of contact for clean technology producers and adopters, streamlining services and access to government knowledge and expertise and improving information sharing between federal departments. By helping clean technology stakeholders understand the federal system of supports and services through engagements and collaborations, the Clean Growth Hub helps them take their technologies from the laboratory to foreign markets and supports Canada’s transition to a low-carbon economy.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
GIF Target: 9.5 Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending

CIF Ambition: Canada fosters sustainable research and innovation

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 9 – Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

NRCan fosters innovation and continual uptake of advanced geospatial technologies, policies, standards, and methods in data acquisition, processing, and dissemination. NRCan achieves advances in spatial data infrastructure, AI-assisted mapping and modelling, earth observation (EO) ground infrastructure, EO data collection, and resulting core geospatial data through collaborative partnerships with private, public, and Indigenous organizations. Results are freely shared, feeding downstream innovation and development of value-added products amongst public, academic, and private sectors.

These efforts contribute to advancing:

Global Target 9.5 Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending

Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) Ambition 9.1  Canada fosters sustainable research and innovation

Goal 10 Icon

GOAL 10: ADVANCE RECONCILIATION WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND TAKE ACTION ON INEQUALITY

FSDS Context:

Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples is essential to addressing social, economic and environmental inequalities and achieving substantive equality. Urgent action is needed to close the social, economic, health, environmental protection, and educational gaps between Indigenous Peoples and the rest of Canada to ensure that everyone in Canada can enjoy the same quality of life, regardless of who they are or where they were born. NRCan continues to be an active participant in tackling inequality and advancing reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis communities through its continued commitment to supporting Justice Canada in developing the UN Declaration Act Action Plan in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous Peoples in accordance with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act. NRCan has committed over $8 million to engage with Indigenous partners to develop a National Benefits-Sharing Framework to ensure Indigenous communities derive benefits from major natural resource projects in their territories. Additionally, NRCan is advancing the participation of Indigenous Peoples in the minerals and metals sector through the Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan (CMMP).

Target theme: Advancing reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit, and the Métis communities  

Target: Between 2023 and 2026, and every year on an ongoing basis, develop and table annual progress reports on implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act

Supporting Justice Canada in the development of the UN Declaration Act Action Plan through engagement with industry stakeholders, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous

Program:
Nòkwewashk

 

Performance indicator:
Percentage of respondents indicating satisfaction with NRCan’s engagement process

Starting point:
New initiative (0% in April 2023)

Target:
70% by March 31, 2024

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act requires the Government of Canada, in consultation and cooperation with Indigenous Peoples, to “take all measures necessary to ensure that federal laws are consistent with the Declaration (section 5), prepare and implement an action plan to achieve the objectives of the Declaration (section 6), and develop annual reports on progress and submit them to Parliament (section 7). To advance reconciliation and reduce inequalities, NRCan will continue to support Justice Canada in development of the UN Declaration Act Action Plan by consulting with Indigenous Peoples and engaging with Indigenous organizations and industry stakeholders; by feeding into the whole-of-government progress reports; and by taking measures to ensure that existing laws and future laws reflect the rights and principles of the Declaration.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced

CIF Indicator: 10.2.1 Proportion of the population reporting discrimination or unfair treatment

GIF Target: 10.3 Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices, and promoting appropriate legislation, policies, and actions in this regard.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal Advance reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples and take action on inequality” but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Co-manage natural resources, collaborate, and share benefits with Indigenous Peoples

Develop a National Benefits-Sharing Framework to improve the quality and consistency of benefits that Indigenous communities derive from natural resource projects in their territories

Program:
Indigenous Partnerships Office

 

Performance indicator:
Percentage of respondents indicating satisfaction with NRCan’s engagement process

Starting point:
New initiative (0% in April 2023)

Target:
70% by September 30, 2024

The National Benefits-Sharing Framework (NBSF) will improve the quality and consistency of benefits that Indigenous communities derive from major natural resource projects in their territories. Budget 2023 provided $8.7 million for NRCan to engage with Indigenous partners to develop the Framework, and to explore opportunities to increase Indigenous communities’ access to capital to invest in natural resource projects. By fostering the removal of barriers to participation of Indigenous Peoples in the Canadian economy, the Framework will help to reduce inequalities and advance reconciliation. NRCan engagement with key partners will assist in determining specific components and the scope of these components in NBSF development.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced

CIF Indicator: 10.2.1 Proportion of the population reporting discrimination or unfair treatment

GIF Target: 10.3 Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices, and promoting appropriate legislation, policies, and actions in this regard.

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 10 – Reduced Inequalities

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

The Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan (CMMP) is working to advance the participation of Indigenous Peoples in the minerals and metals sector. By exploring opportunities for increased Indigenous procurement and business activity in the mining sector, which generates own-source revenues, the CMMP supports economic reconciliation.

These efforts contribute to advancing:

Global Target 10.3 Ensure equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome, including by eliminating discriminatory laws, policies and practices and promoting appropriate legislation, policies and action in this regard

Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) Ambition 10.1 Canadians live free of discrimination and inequalities are reduced

Goal 12 Icon

GOAL 12: REDUCE WASTE AND TRANSITION TO ZERO-EMISSION VEHICLES

FSDS Context:

By transitioning to a cleaner and more circular economy that prioritizes reducing consumption and waste generation, reusing the resources already extracted, and finding processes and technologies that take a holistic systems-based approach to minimizing waste throughout the economy, we can help reduce negative impacts on the environment. Doing this also improves resilience to resource shortages, rising or volatile prices, and supply chain interruptions.

NRCan remains focused on Canada’s efforts to reduce waste and transition to zero-emissions vehicles by improving the disposal management of non-hazardous operational waste, and by supporting the implementation of a federal action plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions with a 100% zero-emissions vehicle fleet, an operational greening strategy, and targeted training for employees focused on green procurement. Additionally, NRCan is supporting sustainable consumption and production patterns with the Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan (CMMP), which calls for greater collaboration between governments and industry to reduce waste in support of a more circular economy.

Target theme: Federal Leadership on Responsible Consumption 

Target: By 2030, the Government of Canada will divert from landfill at least 75% by weight of non-hazardous operational waste (All Ministers)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Maximize diversion of waste from landfills

Improve management of the disposal of non-hazardous operational waste in NRCan’s operations

Program:
Internal Services

 

 

Performance indicator:
Percentage of non-hazardous operational waste (by weight) diverted from landfills

Starting point:
74.6% in 2022-23

Target:
75% by March 31, 2030

NRCan's non-hazardous waste diversion operations support the departmental and government-wide commitment to transition to greener operations. Actions include conducting regular waste audits to track results and reviewing and evaluating recommendations for continuous improvement as part of NRCan's Operational Greening Strategy, currently under development.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner

CIF Indicator: 12.3.1 Total waste diversion per capita

GIF Target: 12.5 By 2030, substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling, and reuse

Target: The Government of Canada’s procurement of goods and services will be net-zero emissions by 2050, to aid the transition to a net-zero, circular economy (All Ministers)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Transform the federal
light-duty fleet

Continue to support the implementation of a federal action plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal buildings and fleets

Program:
Internal Services

 

Performance indicator:
Percentage of light-duty NRCan fleet vehicles that are zero-emission vehicles (ZEV) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEV)

Starting point:
10% ZEV or HEV as of March 31, 2023

Target:
100% ZEV or hybrid by 2030

NRCan is currently developing a Material Management Framework, Operational Greening Strategy, and five-year operational plan to support the procurement of zero-emission vehicles within the Department. Collectively, these efforts will ensure a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from federal fleets.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner

CIF Target: 12.1.1 Zero-emission vehicles represent 10% of new light duty vehicle sales by 2020, 30% by 2030, and 100% by 2040

GIF Target: 12.7 Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Strengthen green procurement criteria

Encourage new procurement employees to complete the optional Green Procurement course

Program:
Internal Services

Performance indicator:
Percentage of employees in procurement who have completed training on green procurement

Starting point:
64% as of March 31, 2023

Target:
90 % by March 31, 2024

NRCan’s action supports the Policy on Green Procurement by promoting the protection of the environment and supporting sustainable development through the integration of environmental performance considerations into the procurement decision-making process. Additionally, the Operational Greening Strategy currently under development will include provisions to strengthen green procurement policies.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner

CIF Indicator: 12.2.1 Proportion of businesses that adopted selected environmental protection activities and management practices

GIF Target: 12.7 Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable, in accordance with national policies and priorities

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal Reduce waste and transition to zero-emission vehicles” but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Boost the supply of critical minerals for the green and digital economy

Unlock funding announced in Budget 2022 to implement the Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy

Programs:
Provision of Federal Leadership in the Minerals and Metals Sector; Geoscience for Sustainable Development of Natural Resources; Green Mining Innovation; Indigenous Partnerships Office

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of funding unlocked to support implementation of the Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy

Starting Point:
New initiative (0% as of 2022)

Target:
100% by December 31, 2023

The Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy seeks to increase the the supply of responsibly sourced critical minerals and support the development of domestic and global value chains for the green and digital economy through a range of initiatives that span the entire value chain, from exploration to mining to recycling. Critical minerals are the building blocks for the green and digital economy. They are used in a wide range of essential products, from mobile phones to solar panels, electric vehicle batteries to medical and healthcare devices, to military and national defence applications. Without critical minerals, there can be no green energy transition for Canada and the world. By investing in critical minerals today, we are building a sustainable industrial base to support emission-reducing supply chains that will address climate change for generations to come (e.g., net-zero energy and transportation systems).

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

GIF Target: 12.2 By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources.

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

The Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan (CMMP) calls for greater collaboration between governments and industry to reduce waste and support the circular economy. Through the CMMP strategic direction on the Environment, NRCan supports actions that contribute to sustainable consumption and production patterns, while positioning Canada as a reliable, sustainable, and responsible source of natural resources.

These efforts contribute to advancing:

GIF Target: 12.2 By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources.
CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner

Goal 13 Icon

GOAL 13: TAKE ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACTS

FSDS Context:

Communities across the country are experiencing the impacts of climate change from extreme events such as wildfires, flooding, and heat waves, to rising sea levels, melting ice, and permafrost. NRCan continues to support the ongoing delivery of results and services in support of effective action on climate change by: working with provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous organizations and communities, and other stakeholders to increase Canada’s resilience to a changing climate; advancing clean and emerging technologies, which reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions; and by sharing tools, climate change, and energy information with its stakeholders, and archiving and disseminating authoritative geospatial data to support climate change actions and decision-making. NRCan’s Forest Climate Change Program is demonstrative of these actions. The Program provides science-based information, data, and tools to support adaptation actions in forests and forested landscapes across Canada under a changing climate, informs actions to meet greenhouse gas emission reduction targets, and ensures forest-related greenhouse gas reporting requirements are met, advancing Canada’s commitment to tackling climate change and its impacts.

Target theme: Federal Leadership on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions and Climate Resilience

Target: The Government of Canada will transition to net-zero carbon operations for facilities and conventional fleets by 2050 (All Ministers)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Implement the Greening Government Strategy through measures that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve climate resilience, and green the government’s overall operations

Develop an operational greening strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from NRCan’s buildings and fleets

Program:
Internal Services

Performance indicator:
Percentage reduction in equivalent greenhouse gas emissions from NRCan facilities and fleets compared to 2005-06 baseline

Starting point:
43.5% as of March 31, 2023 (preliminary results)

Target:
40% by 2030Footnote 12; 90% by 2050

The Departmental Greening Strategy, currently under development, will advance creation and implementation of a roadmap and action plan to achieve multiple greening targets, including greenhouse gas reduction, climate resilience and other greening metrics in the Greening Government Strategy. This work will be combined with a comprehensive Real Property Portfolio Strategy that will seek to adjust the portfolio to its needs and that will direct Net Zero Carbon as a standard for new construction. On the fleet side, a review of the fleet management, review of the fleet requirements and five-year operational plan to support the procurement of zero-emission vehicles within the Department.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

CIF Target 13.1.1 By 2030, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions by 40 to 45%, relative to 2005 emission levels. By 2050, achieve economy-wide net-zero greenhouse gas emissions

GIF Target: 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

Target: The Government of Canada will transition to climate resilient operations by 2050 (All Ministers)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Reduce risks posed by climate change to federal assets, services and operations

Incorporate and strengthen the consideration of climate change in business continuity planning, departmental risk planning or equivalent processes, and program design and delivery considerations

Program:
Internal Services

Performance indicator:
Inclusion of climate risk considerations in the Real Property Portfolio Considerations and Departmental Greening Strategy

Starting point:
New initiative (not included as of May, 2023)

Target:
Included by March 31, 2030

Consistent with the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework, NRCan will continue to improve understanding of and take action to reduce the risks posed by climate change to federal assets, services, and operations across the country. These actions include strengthening the consideration of climate change in its key business processes and strategies, including its Real Property Management Framework, Environmental Management Framework, Departmental Greening Strategy, and Real Property Portfolio Strategy, through specific initiatives that include improving insulation and ventilation to harden federal assets against the physical impacts of climate change, and implementing measures to protect shore-based assets from increasingly volatile storms. NRCan has completed 2 Facilities Climate Risk and Vulnerability Assessments that will inform recommendation to increase resiliency of its built portfolio.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change

GIF Target: 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning

 Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal Take action on climate change and its impacts” but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Collaborate on emergency management and disaster risk reduction

Facilitate provision of geospatial data to support national and international emergency management efforts

Program:
Core Geospatial Data

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of responses to requests for geospatial data through International Charter: Space and Major Disasters

Starting Point:
100% in 2019-20

Target:
100% in 2023-24

Satellite Earth observation uses satellites to gather information about the Earth’s oceans, land, climate and populated areas. Satellite geospatial data are critical to taking action on and adapting to climate change by enabling applications and services in many areas that support the health and well-being of Canadians. Satellite Earth observation also provides vital information to support climate science and modelling.   The International Charter: Space and Major Disasters is a worldwide collaboration which provides for the charitable and humanitarian acquisition and transmission of satellite data to relief organizations in the event of major disasters.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change

GIF Target 13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptative capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

GIF Target 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies, and planning

Support climate change adaptation across Canada

Increase uptake and use of climate change mitigation, resilience and adaptation tools and information by decision-makers

Program:
Innovative Geospatial Solutions

Performance indicator:
Number of stakeholders who acknowledge using NRCan’s scientific and technical products in making their decisions

Starting point:
3 as of March 31, 2023

Target:
6 by March 31, 2024

This End User Survey will be used to measure the use of Canada Centre for Mapping and Earth Observation research and development outputs for decision-making or objectives to create new geospatial data and tools towards climate change and its impacts

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change

GIF Target 13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptative capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

GIF Target 13.3 Improve education, awareness-raising, and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction, and early warning

Other

Enhance logistics support through the Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP) for scientific research conducted in the Canadian Arctic

Program:
Polar Continental Shelf Program

Performance Indicator:
Number of scientific publications acknowledging Polar Continental Shelf Program support

Starting Point:
PCSP support was acknowledged in 143 publications in 2022

Target:
143 annually

The logistics support provided by the Polar Continental Shelf Program for field research in the Arctic regions of Canada contributes to the growing body of knowledge about the northern most parts of Canada. With increased scientific information, Canadians can make informed decisions to help reduce the impacts of climate change, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change

CIF Indicator: No specific indicator

GIF Target: 13.3 Improve education, awareness-raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning

Other

Support the development of technologies to reduce energy consumption and a reliance on diesel in mining and milling operations

Program:
Green Mining Innovation

 

 

Performance indicator:
Percentage of innovative mining technologies developed by NRCan that are ready for commercial use

Starting point:
New program (0% as of March 31, 2023)

Target:
25% by March 31, 2027

Supporting the development of technologies to reduce energy consumption and a reliance on diesel in mining and milling operations will limit the impact of climate change by reducing the environmental footprint of a major industrial sector in Canada.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians consume in a sustainable manner

GIF Target: 12.2 By 2030, achieve the sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources.

Other

Build capacity for decision-making on climate resilience

Program:
Climate Change Adaptation

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of target stakeholders reporting they have the capacity to apply climate change adaptation tools and information for adaptation decision-making

Starting Point:
Communities: 15%  in 2018
Natural Resources Businesses: 51% in 2018

Target:
Communities: % by the end of 2027
Natural Resource Businesses: 60% by the end of 2027

The Climate Change Adaptation Division delivers adaptation programming, knowledge assessments, and the Climate Change Adaptation Platform, all contributing to advancing and implementing adaptation measures nationally. Through collaboration and partnerships, this work supports the generation and use of knowledge and expertise, and the development and dissemination of decision-making tools. It results in increased capacity across natural resource sectors and the professions they depend on, better equipping decision-makers to take action on climate change and its impacts.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition/Target: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change

CIF Indicator: 13.3.1 Proportion of municipal organizations who factored climate change adaptation into decision-making processes

GIF Target: 13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

Other

Provide access to, archive and disseminate authoritative geospatial data to support climate change action and decision-making

Program:
Core Geospatial Data

Performance Indicator:
Number of images downloaded by federal departments from the Earth Observation Data Management System (EODMS) to support climate change decision-making

Starting Point:
41,829 in 2022-23

Target:
At least 41,829 in 2023-24

EODMS data such as National Master Standing Offers (NMSO) and RADARSAT support the production of post-event maps such as earthquake land deformation, ice maps in the North, and emergency flood maps to help local governments understand the impact of natural disasters and carry out risk reduction activities. Additionally, these data support development of information products to measure and communicate climate change impacts, helping to shape Government of Canada policies, strategies, and planning. Finally, effective 2023, NMSO data will be shared with Indigenous Peoples, building on Canada’s Indigenous Climate Leadership ambitions.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change

GIF Target:  3.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries

GIF Target: 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies, and planning

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 13 – Climate Action

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

Climate change is affecting the safety, health, and quality of life of people across Canada. Every year, the country faces increasing record-breaking climate events, including wildfires, extreme heatwaves, and floods, on top of slow onset climate impacts, such as thawing permafrost and rising sea levels.  Canada’s first National Adaptation Strategy and the Government of Canada Adaptation Action Plan outline a shared path and sets common direction for a more climate resilient Canada through resilient roads, bridges, sewers, and other infrastructure; healthier communities; enhanced biodiversity and nature conservation; and a climate resilient economy and workers.

The Canadian Hazards Information Service (CHIS) provides authoritative, actionable, and timely information about geological hazards, space weather phenomena, and nuclear and radiological incidents. CHIS is augmenting the information it provides for earthquakes through the development of an Earthquake Early Warning system. Upon completion, the early warning system will provide seconds to minutes of warning of a major earthquake to high-risk areas, allowing mitigation measures to be taken for critical infrastructure.

NRCan is the lead federal department in the Flood Hazard Identification and Mapping Program (FHIMP), collaborating with provinces and territories to complete flood hazard maps of higher risk areas in Canada and make this flood hazard information accessible to Canadians. The FHIMP will help ensure communities and all people living in Canada are better enabled to prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the hazards, risks and consequences of flooding linked to the changing climate.

The Canadian Forest Service continues to implement the plan to plant two billion incremental trees over 10 years to increase carbon sequestration and help combat climate change and its impacts, while providing co-benefits to communities and ecosystems. This will be accomplished by funding tree planting projects with provinces and territories, for profit and not-for-profit organizations, municipalities, and Indigenous organizations. Canada will continue to support the international collaborative project “moja global” (which includes other countries and a variety of funding and scientific/technical organizations) to maintain and refine software and tools to measure, report, and verify (MRV) land-based greenhouse gas emissions and removals. Canada supports this initiative both technically through carbon modelling expertise, as well as through funding to broaden the uptake of the MRV approach in other countries.

The Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan (CMMP), through its strategic directions on the Environment and on Science, Technology, and Innovation, identifies climate change adaptation and alternate and renewable energy as areas of provincial, territorial, and federal action, and calls for more government collaboration with stakeholders to develop incentives for the adoption of new and clean technologies and innovative practices.

NRCan leads on the Economy and Workers System of the National Adaptation Strategy. In support of its objectives, the department will deliver programming that will: build capacity of professionals such as engineers and planners to apply climate change adaptation tools in their work; improve the ability of natural resource businesses to integrate adaptation plans and strategies, and support regional-scale pilot projects on adaptation in coastal regions

These efforts contribute to advancing:

Global Target 13.1 Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate-related hazards and natural disasters in all countries.

Global Target 13.2 Integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning.

Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) Ambition 13.2 - Canadians are well-equipped and resilient to face the effects of climate change

Goal 14 Icon

GOAL 14: CONSERVE AND PROTECT CANADA’S OCEANS

FSDS Context:

Protecting Canada’s coasts and ocean resources is crucial to the livelihood of Canadians, including from the potential risk of oil spills that have an environmental impact on Canada’s fisheries and coastlines. NRCan supports marine conservation measures and the Ocean Protection Plan by conducting scientific research and increasing knowledge related to marine geoscience that supports marine spatial planning and the impacts of oil spills on Canada’s oceans. NRCan also conducts ongoing research into the extent of Canada’s continental shelf in the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, supporting implementation of international law as reflected in UNCLOS, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources.

Target theme: Ocean Protection and Conservation    

Target: Conserve 25% of marine and coastal areas by 2025, and 30% by 2030, in support of the commitment to work to halt and reverse nature loss by 2030 in Canada, and achieve a full recovery for nature by 2050 (Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Build knowledge of coastal and marine ecosystems and marine protected areas

Advance marine geoscience products to inform Marine Spatial Planning in impact Assessments, as well as cumulative effects and project assessments in the offshore

Program:
Geoscience for Sustainable Development of Natural Resources

Performance indicator:
Percentage of marine geoscience knowledge products and associated data releases that inform DFO-led Marine Spatial Planning, cumulative effects assessments (e.g., RA) or project assessments in the offshore

Starting Point:
0% as of March 31, 2024

Target:
100% by March 31, 2028

NRCan, through the Marine Geoscience for Marine Spatial Planning Program (MGMSP), provides marine geoscience research to inform impact assessment and other decision-making processes in Canada’s offshore. MGMSP’s outputs contribute to the Government of Canada’s Marine Spatial Planning goal of achieving shared ecological, economic, cultural, and social objectives in the marine environment, including conservation.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Target: Conserve 25% of Canada’s oceans by 2025, working towards 30% by 2030.

CIF Indicator: 14.1.1 Proportion of marine and coastal areas conserved

GIF Target: 14.2 By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans

Protect, manage, and restore marine and coastal areas

Provide resource assessment to advance Canada’s goal of preserving 25% of coastal and marine areas through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures

Program:
Geoscience for Sustainable Development of Natural Resources

 

Performance indicator:
Number of completed resource and economic assessments by NRCan for protected areas that are proposed by Fisheries and Oceans Canada, ECCC, and Parks Canada 

Starting point:
14 as of March 31, 2020

Target:
17 by March 31, 2024

The Marine Conservation Targets program will continue to develop and apply geological methods and assessment tools to provide scientific knowledge on offshore natural resources in support of Canada’s conservation targets for 2025. This knowledge will allow DFO, ECCC, and PCA add to their understanding of these offshore lands and the natural resources found within the boundaries of proposed protected areas, thus supporting Canada in achieving its goal of protecting 10% of Canada’s coastal and marine areas (as a percentage of total marine territory) by 2020, and 25% by 2025 and 30% by 2030. To date, Canada has protected 14.66% of its offshore lands or 824,821 Km2.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Target: Conserve 25% of Canada’s oceans by 2025, working towards 30% by 2030.

CIF Indicator: 14.1.1 Proportion of marine and coastal areas conserved

GIF Target: 14.5.1 Coverage of protected areas in relation to marine areas

Other

Continue to undertake science activities to support Canada’s continental shelf submissions in the Atlantic Ocean and Arctic Ocean beyond 200 nautical miles and advise Global Affairs Canada on scientific and technical issues

Program:
Geological Knowledge for Canada's Onshore and Offshore Land

Performance Indicator:
Number of science activities that aim at securing international recognition of Canada’s outer limits beyond the 200 nautical mile Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)

Starting Point:
New initiative (0 as of May 1, 2023)

Target:
Four marine geoscience surveys by March 31, 2027

Canada ratified the UNCLOS Treaty in 2003 and implemented Article 76 of the treaty to delineate its continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles in the Atlantic and Arctic oceans. The program received renewed funding in Budget 2023 to acquire new data in the Arctic Ocean to support Canada’s revised outer limits. Eventually Canada will have jurisdiction, including the exploration, sustainable use, and conservation of the living and non-living resources on the seafloor and below, of the entire continental shelf through this process.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Target: Conserve 25% of Canada’s oceans by 2025, working towards 30% by 2030.

CIF Indicator: 14.1.1 Proportion of marine and coastal areas conserved

GIF Target: 14.c Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in the United Nations Convention and the Law of the Sea, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of “The future we want”

Other

Conduct research to develop and acquire science-based information and mitigation strategies on how oil migrates through Canadian waters

Program:
Energy Innovation and Clean Technology

Performance Indicator:
Number of science-based presentations, publications, and research reports on oil spills and their fate and behaviour in Canadian waters

Starting Point:
0 in 2021-22

Target:
12 by 2025-26 Marine Conservation Targets (MCT) Initiative; 20 by 2026-27 – Multi-Partner Research Initiative (MPRI)

Adding to our scientific understanding of how oil migrates through Canadian waters will serve as the basis for efforts to ensure Canada’s oceans are conserved, by informing environmental assessments, clean-up methods, and evidence-based decision-making related to marine and coastal protection.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canada protects and conserves marine areas and sustainably manages ocean fish stocks

CIF Target: 14.1.1 Conserve 25% of Canada's oceans by 2025, working towards 30% by 2030

GIF Target: 14.5 By 2020, conserve at least 10% of coastal and marine areas, consistent with national and international law and based on the best available scientific information

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 14 – Life Below Water

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

Upcoming geoscience and bathymetric surveys in the central Arctic Ocean in 2025, 2026 and 2027 by the UNCLOS Program (GSC/LMS) will share data with international efforts to map the world’s seafloor via the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO) and Seabed 2030, forming part of Canada’s contribution to the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030).

These efforts contribute to advancing:

Global Target 14.2 By 2020, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts, including by strengthening their resilience, and take action for their restoration in order to achieve healthy and productive oceans.

Global Target 14.c Enhance the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources by implementing international law as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, which provides the legal framework for the conservation and sustainable use of oceans and their resources, as recalled in paragraph 158 of “The future we want”

Goal 15 Icon

GOAL 15: PROTECT AND RECOVER SPECIES, CONSERVE CANADIAN BIODIVERSITY

FSDS Context:

Sustainable forest management is contingent upon healthy forests, but climate change brings challenges that could seriously impact the ecological integrity of forest health.  NRCan conducts research and provides information and advice to provinces, territories, Indigenous Peoples, and the private sector to promote the protection, sustainable management, and efficient use of forest resources. The department uses scientific research, technology, and collaboration to protect forest resources from pest outbreaks, as well as from wildfire threats. NRCan also plays a large role in building capacity for Indigenous Peoples in connection to lands and forests. This includes the promotion of environmental stewardship, job creation, and the sustainable use and management of forest resources.

Target: Between 2023 and 2026, Canada’s sustainable wood supply level (guided by sustainable forest management policies to reflect the current unique social, environmental and economic characteristics of managed forests), exceeds the annual timber harvests (Minister of Natural Resources)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Better understand lands and forests

Advance science and technology on forest health protection

Program:
Pest Risk Management

 

Performance indicator:
Number of NRCan publications pertaining to forest pests and related risks, surveillance solutions, and response solutions that are developed annually

Starting point:
52 in 2018-19

Target:
52 publications or more annually

Sustainable forest management is contingent upon healthy forests.  Outbreaks of native forest insects and diseases, and the introduction of invasive alien species result in tree growth reduction and mortality, which may negatively affect the ecological integrity of forests.  Climate change could amplify these impacts. Advancing pest risk management science and technology to prevent, prepare for, and respond to pests supports the protection of forest health across Canada and contributes to maintaining Canada’s annual timber harvest at or below sustainable wood supply level.  Scientific publications are one of the primary forms of disseminating research results.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canada sustainably manages forests, lakes and rivers

GIF Target: 15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests, and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally

Promote participation in Canada’s forest sector and support the transition to a sustainable economy

Develop innovative forest products and decision tools that strengthen knowledge of forest ecosystems and contribute to the environmental sustainability of Canada’s forests

Programs:
Sustainable Forest Management; Fibre Solutions; Cumulative Effects

 

Performance indicator:
Percentage of innovative forest products and decision tools informed by NRCan research that contributes to the Environmental Sustainability of Canada’s forests

Starting point:
100%

Target:
95% annually

NRCan develops scientific knowledge products and decision-making tools about Canada’s forests that are used by forest decision makers (e.g., provinces, territories, Canadian industry, private land-owners, etc.) to enable sustainable forest management. NRCan products and tools contribute to a better understanding of forest conditions and changes in response to natural disturbance, climate change and forest management practices. The innovative products and decision tools developed by participating programs strengthen knowledge of forest ecosystems and contribute to the environmental sustainability of Canada’s forests. These innovations support the forest sector to maximize the value of Canada’s forests while maintaining healthy forest ecosystems by reducing existing and potential environmental impacts. New products and decision tools support sustainable forest management in Canada’s forests and maintaining harvest levels below sustainable wood supply levels.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canada sustainably manages forests, lakes and rivers

GIF Target: 15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally

Target theme: Species Protection and Recovery    

Target: By 2026, increase the percentage of species at risk listed under federal law that exhibit population trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans to 60%, from a baseline of 42% in 2019 (Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard)

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Work with partners to enhance foundational knowledge of species, habitats and ecosystems

Support sustainable management of Canada’s forests, in collaboration with provinces and territories

Program:
Sustainable Forest Management

 

Performance indicator:
Amount in cubic meter (m3) of wood harvested annually compared to sustainable wood supply

Starting point:
141 million m3 total harvest versus 215 million m3 in wood supply in 2020 (State of Canada’s Forests Report, 2022)

Target:
Annual harvest is at or below sustainable wood supply levels

Sustainable forest management is a shared responsibility across all governments, the private sector and civil society for using and caring for forests to maintain their environmental, social and economic value and benefits over time. NRCan promotes responsible and transparent practices in the forest sector and supports provinces and territories in their role as forest managers to help ensure Canada’s forests are sustainable for years to come.
Supporting sustainable forest management in Canada directly contributes to the goal of sustainably managed land and forests, and helps to maintain Canada’s annual timber harvest at or below sustainable wood levels.

Sustainable forest management includes consideration of knowledge and data concerning ecosystems, habitats and species. NRCan develops scientific knowledge products and decision-making tools about Canada’s forests that are used by forest decision-makers (e.g., provinces, territories, Canadian industry, private land owners, etc.) to enable sustainable forest management.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canada sustainably manages forests, lakes and rivers

GIF Target: 15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests, and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal Protect and recover species, conserve Canadian biodiversity” but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Prevent, detect, respond to, control and manage invasive alien species

Increased availability of scientific knowledge and advice pertaining to forest pests and related risks

Program:
Pest Risk Management

 

 

Performance indicator:
Number of NRCan publications pertaining to forest invasive alien species and related risks, surveillance solutions, and response solutions that are developed annually

Starting point:
14 in 2022-23

Target:
14 publications or more annually

Mitigating the loss of biodiversity requires healthy forests.  The introduction of invasive alien species can result in tree growth reduction and mortality, which may negatively affect biodiversity and the ecological integrity of forests.  Climate change could amplify these impacts. Advancing pest risk management science and technology to prevent, prepare for, and respond to invasive alien species supports the protection of forest health across Canada. Scientific publications are one of the primary forms of disseminating research results.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: 15.4 Canada sustainably manages forests, lakes and rivers

GIF Target: 15.5 Take urgent and significant action to reduce the degradation of natural habitats, halt the loss of biodiversity and, by 2020, protect and prevent the extinction of threatened species

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 15 – Life on Land

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

Canada will continue to monitor and report progress toward sustainable forest management and advance the monitoring systems and technologies used, including work to develop common understanding and systematic monitoring of forest degradation.

These efforts contribute to advancing:
Global Target 15.2 By 2020, promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests, halt deforestation, restore degraded forests and substantially increase afforestation and reforestation globally
Canadian Indicator Framework (CIF) Ambition 15.4 Canada sustainably manages forests, lakes and rivers

Goal 17 Icon

GOAL 17: STRENGTHEN PARTNERSHIPS TO PROMOTE GLOBAL ACTION ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

FSDS Context:

Diverse and inclusive partnerships are required at the local, regional, national, and global levels to achieve the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals. To advance these ambitions, NRCan leads the collection, monitoring, and dissemination of space-based data and information to protect the environment and to provide critical services on which Canadians rely.  Through its Innovative Geospatial Solutions Program, NRCan is leading the day-to-day operations of the Satellite Earth Observation initiative to collect and disseminate earth observation data, and is supporting its national and international partners in monitoring the environment and ecosystems in Canada. Additionally, NRCan is strengthening global partnerships on critical minerals-related geoscience to increase the supply of responsibly sourced critical minerals and support the development of domestic and global value chains for the green and digital economy.

Implementation strategies supporting the goal

This section is for implementation strategies that support the goal Strengthen partnerships to promote global action on sustainable development” but not a specific FSDS target

Implementation Strategy Departmental Action Performance Indicator Starting Point Target How the Departmental Action contributes to the FSDS Goal and Target and, where applicable, to Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy and SDGs

Work with partners to monitor and protect our ecosystems through space-based services and technologies

Leverage our world-class scientific innovation and partnerships to protect Canadians and our ecosystems from the impacts of natural and human-induced hazards

Program:
Innovative Geospatial Solutions

Performance indicator:
Percentage of satellite station uptimeFootnote 13(NRCan only)

Starting point:
99.7% in 2018-2019

Target:
Maintain 99.7% satellite station uptime

In collaboration with ECCC and ISED, NRCan is leading the day-to-day operations of the Satellite Earth Observation initiative to collect and disseminate earth observation data. Through these activities, NRCan is supporting our national and international partners in monitoring the environment to ensure the protection of Canadians and our ecosystems from the impacts of natural and human-induced hazards.

Relevant targets or ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Canada fosters collaboration and partnerships to advance the SDGs

Advance international collaboration on critical minerals

Support Canada’s international commitments and engagements in critical minerals-related geoscience, R&D, trade and investment attraction, and transparency and sustainability initiatives

Program:
Provision of Federal Leadership in the Minerals and Metals

Performance Indicator:
Percentage of funding unlocked for the Global Partnerships Initiative

Starting Point:
New initiative (0% as of 2022)

Target:
100% by December 31, 2023

The Global Partnerships Initiative is part of the Canadian Critical Minerals Strategy, which seeks to increase the supply of responsibly sourced critical minerals and support the development of domestic and global value chains for the green and digital economy.

Relevant Targets or Ambitions:
CIF Ambition: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

GIF Target: 17.16 By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix

Initiatives advancing Canada’s implementation of SDG 17 – Partnerships for the Goals

The following initiatives demonstrate how NRCan programming supports the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, supplementing the information outlined above.

Planned Initiatives Associated Domestic Targets or Ambitions and/or Global Targets

Natural Resources Canada is committed to being a global leader in increasing transparency and good governance. Leading by example, the Extractive Sector Transparency Measures Act (ESTMA) increases extractive sector transparency in Canada. Canada was also the first jurisdiction to develop guidance for industry, playing an integral role in shaping the emerging global standard on mandatory reporting for the extractive sector, and also the first jurisdiction to launch a compliance program to improve data integrity, and data portal to improve data accessibility.

Leveraging expertise from implementing the ESTMA, Canada additionally plays a prominent role in the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), an international transparency standard in the mining, oil and gas sectors that requires implementing countries to annually report on revenue collection and allocation, among other issues, in the extractive sector. The EITI Board is comprised of implementing countries, supporting countries, supporting companies and civil society organizations. Canada continues to play an active role in the initiative, and will host the EITI Board meeting in February 2024.

These efforts contribute to advancing:

Global Target 17.1 Strengthen domestic resource mobilization, including through international support to developing countries, to improve domestic capacity for tax and other revenue collection

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Section 5: Integrating Sustainable Development

NRCan will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through its Strategic Environmental Assessment process (SEA). An SEA for a policy, plan or program proposal includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on relevant FSDS goals and targets.

Public statements on the results of NRCan’s assessments are made public when an initiative has undergone a detailed SEA (see NRCan’s Public Statements Listing). The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects (including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets) of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision-making.

To support integration of sustainable development into our internal policy and operational processes, NRCan will continue to advance several initiatives:

  •  To build knowledge of the SDGs and sustainable development within the department, engagement sessions were held with sectors in 2022-23. These sessions outlined key roles and responsibilities with respect to SDG reporting, both within NRCan, and the larger federal government context.
  • NRCan conducts a functional review of every Treasury Board submission to identify the alignments of a program or initiative to the SDGs and 2022-26 FSDS chapters. Functional reviews from the sustainable development perspective are necessary for tracking how many programs and initiatives contribute to the advancement of the SDGs and federal sustainable development commitments.
  • Finally, NRCan actively supports the federal government’s Greening Government Strategy objective to transition to net-zero carbon and climate-resilient operations, while also reducing environmental impacts beyond carbon, including on waste, water and biodiversity. NRCan is developing a Departmental Greening Strategy that will advance the implementation of an action plan to achieve multiple greening targets, including greenhouse gas reduction, climate resilience, and greening procurement. NRCan is currently conducting a review of fleet requirements and management as well as a five-year operational plan to support the procurement of zero-emission vehicles.

Collectively, these initiatives will ensure that while NRCan is contributing to broader federal efforts to tackle climate change, we are also taking steps to ensure sustainable development is fully ingrained in our departmental culture and integrated into our key programs and policies, now and in the future.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Footnote 1 In addition to providing funding, NRCan also provides unique and critical support to Canadian innovation ecosystems that is required to bring new technologies from concept to market, including: connecting proponents with potential investors, partners, adopters or follow-on funders; providing expert advice to proponents and facilitating connections with other experts to help tackle non-technical barriers to growth; and engaging in the development or enhancement of codes, standards and regulations to help proponents bring their solutions to scale.

Footnote 2

Footnote 2 In addition to providing funding, NRCan also provides unique and critical support to Canadian innovation ecosystems that is required to bring new technologies from concept to market, including: connecting proponents with potential investors, partners, adopters or follow-on funders; providing expert advice to proponents and facilitating connections with other experts to help tackle non-technical barriers to growth; and engaging in the development or enhancement of codes, standards and regulations to help proponents bring their solutions to scale.

Footnote 3

Footnote 3 A petajoule (PJ) is a standard unit of energy. 1 PJ is equivalent to the amount of energy 10,000 homes would use for one year.

Footnote 4

Footnote 4 In addition to providing funding, NRCan also provides unique and critical support to Canadian innovation ecosystems that is required to bring new technologies from concept to market, including: connecting proponents with potential investors, partners, adopters or follow-on funders; providing expert advice to proponents and facilitating connections with other experts to help tackle non-technical barriers to growth; and engaging in the development or enhancement of codes, standards and regulations to help proponents bring their solutions to scale.

Footnote 5

Footnote 5 A petajoule (PJ) is a standard unit of energy. 1 PJ is equivalent to the amount of energy 10,000 homes would use for one year.

Footnote 6

Footnote 6 In addition to providing funding, NRCan also provides unique and critical support to Canadian innovation ecosystems that is required to bring new technologies from concept to market, including: connecting proponents with potential investors, partners, adopters or follow-on funders; providing expert advice to proponents and facilitating connections with other experts to help tackle non-technical barriers to growth; and engaging in the development or enhancement of codes, standards and regulations to help proponents bring their solutions to scale.

Footnote 7

Footnote 7 In the 2022-26 FSDS under this target theme, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is listed in as one of the responsible organizations for the implementation strategies, “Invest in the deployment and adoption of clean technologies”, and “Invest in research, development, and demonstration of clean technologies”, both of which support the SD Tech Fund target. NRCan is not a participating organization in the Sustainable Development Technology Canada’s SD Tech Fund, and will not report any departmental actions under these implementation strategies. In this DSDS, under FSDS Goal 7, NRCan presents its actions related to investments in both, the deployment and adoption of, and the research, development and demonstration of, clean energy technologies.

Footnote 8

Footnote 8 The target date of March 31, 2027 refers to when the funding envelope ends for projects to build chargers and refueling stations. The date for the completion of the 50,000 charges and refueling stations is March 31, 2029.

Footnote 9

Footnote 9 This departmental action supports both targets above and the FSDS Implementation Strategy: Invest in the deployment of electric vehicle chargers and hydrogen refueling stations.

Footnote 10

Footnote 10 The Canada Infrastructure Bank is also investing $500M in support of these targets

Footnote 11

Footnote 11 In addition to providing funding, NRCan also provides unique and critical support to Canadian innovation ecosystems that is required to bring new technologies from concept to market, including: connecting proponents with potential investors, partners, adopters or follow-on funders; providing expert advice to proponents and facilitating connections with other experts to help tackle non-technical barriers to growth; and engaging in the development or enhancement of codes, standards and regulations to help proponents bring their solutions to scale.

Footnote 12

Footnote 12 The federal Greening Government Strategy sets a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target of 40% below 2005-06 levels by 2025 for facilities and fleets. NRCan has met this target in advance of the 2025 deadline with a GHG emissions reduction starting point of 43.5% from 2005-06 levels.

Footnote 13

Footnote 13 “Uptime” is the measure of time that satellite ground stations are available and working, as a percentage of total time in one year (24 hours per day, 365 days per year).

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